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does gravity have a length?

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does gravity have a length?
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nemesissUser avatarPosts: 1259Joined: Sun Sep 13, 2009 7:29 pm

Post does gravity have a length?

I was watching the documentairy on black holes which was quite interesting.


At one point the make a point that in black holes general relativity breaks down and that quantum mechanics is required.
the problem they have is with gravity, which makes it difficult to impossible to combine.

though i have no facts to back it up, i wouldn't be surprised if gravity and the other forces have a range at which they work. if this is true, then gravity could be said to have a length.


This made me wonder at what point, does it become impossible to meassure/apply gravity?
what impact do the other forces, such as the electro magnetic and the strong forces, have on particles around that point?
do they over power gravity, to they "take over the role of" gravity, to they negate gravity?



anyone got any thoughts, idea's or papers about it?
Wed Sep 05, 2012 9:55 pm
pyrettablazePosts: 4Joined: Thu Sep 13, 2012 4:19 am Gender: Female

Post Re: does gravity have a length?

This is interesting... I wonder if you have explored the quantum string theory. Where it breaks gravity which used to be weaker that EM down into strings. Think of vibrations through dimensions and puts it back onto equal level with elctro-magnatism. It is an intersting therory that I personally love. Watch Novas Elegant Universe to learn more, or read Brian Greene's book. Books are always better but documenaries faster hahaha!
Thu Sep 13, 2012 4:54 am
Dragan GlasContributorUser avatarPosts: 2954Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 1:55 amLocation: Ireland Gender: Male

Post Re: does gravity have a length?

Greetings,

In normal space, I think gravity has a effective limit based on distance: a object at sufficient distance from another larger body's gravitational field would be relatively(!) unaffected by it.

The problem is identifying a place in space that is not affected by gravity.

With regard to particles, I think this might occur - and be observable - in inter-galactic space: the gravitational fields of galaxies might be so weak that particles in inter-galactic space would be more likely affected by internal forces rather than gravity.

Within black holes, it would be very difficult to predict, never-mind observe, such phenomena.

Greene's books are very interesting, along with other recent books by various authors.

Kindest regards,

James
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"The Word of God is the Creation we behold and it is in this Word, which no human invention can counterfeit or alter, that God speaketh universally to man."
The Age Of Reason
Fri Sep 14, 2012 2:36 pm
MilktoastUser avatarPosts: 12Joined: Mon Jun 23, 2014 6:28 am

Post Re: does gravity have a length?

Dragan Glas wrote:Greetings,

In normal space, I think gravity has a effective limit based on distance: a object at sufficient distance from another larger body's gravitational field would be relatively(!) unaffected by it.

The problem is identifying a place in space that is not affected by gravity.
-snip-
Within black holes, it would be very difficult to predict, never-mind observe, such phenomena.

With all due respect, Black Holes, Neutron Stars, etc. have never been much an interest to me. Newton is my gravitational attraction. But maybe I can add some.

As said by Dragan, it is impossible by present methods to know what happens inside of a place where gravity breaks down, if it does, AFAIK. The best you can hope for is some indication at a suitable distance so to be able to relate what is going on in indication.

However, all known black holes are very distant, which complicates things.

To the best of my knowledge, none have been found closer than 1,000 light years, and those that came close have on occasion been found to actually been farther away. Like a desert mirage, these bodies play tricks on our sensing abilities.

Accretion disks are the most common, or one of the most common, ways to discover a closer Black Hole. Gravity lenses might be much better farther away, since anything beyond will automatically have it's light bent and while the emptiness of the universe is the norm, there are many anomalies to choose from and it would be too far away to see an accretion disk.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accretion_disc

Eventually, we will have closer black holes to study, if any, plus much more sensitive equipment for studying very small amounts of gas falling into the hole (or rather the electromagnetic radiation away from the body). Another part is a polar jet nearly directly aimed at the Earth. Odd and poorly understood, we might find out a lot more about gravity breaking down from these coming from black holes in accretion disks.

Hope these amateur hour thoughts help.
Tue Jun 24, 2014 9:53 am
ProlescumWebhamsterUser avatarPosts: 5001Joined: Thu Dec 31, 2009 8:41 pmLocation: Peptone-upon-Sores

Post Re: does gravity have a length?

Milktoast wrote:Hope these amateur hour thoughts help.



Ha ha! Milquetoast. Love it.

Welcome to LoR :D
if constructive debate is allowed to progress, better ideas will ultimately supplant worse ideas.

Comment is free, but facts are sacred
Wed Jun 25, 2014 9:57 pm
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