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Psilocybin trials on attitude to death

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Psilocybin trials on attitude to death
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SparhafocPosts: 1333Joined: Fri Jun 23, 2017 6:48 am

Post Psilocybin trials on attitude to death




I found this very interesting, so thought I'd share.
Beliefs are, by definition, things we don't know to be true.
Sun Aug 20, 2017 7:23 pm
thenexttodiePosts: 799Joined: Fri Mar 13, 2015 7:59 pm Gender: Male

Post Re: Psilocybin trials on attitude to death

I cringe when I hear about studies like this.

I have tripped several times on Psilocybin before. Also LSD, LSA, LDN and X(the good ones you could get in the 90's with the Mitsubishi symbol on them). Knowing what I know about them, If I was diagnosed with terminal cancer tomorrow and had only 2 years to live, I seriously doubt I would spend any amount of my short time seeking the ingestion of any of these drugs.

I would also never suggest to a loved one, like my mother, should be taking magic mushrooms were she found to be terminally ill.

(To me, LSA does have an very long term and noticeable effect in lowering anxiety. The trip itself is not the strongest or most pleasurable. Uncomfortable actually. Vein constriction causes pain in the legs and a heavy feeling.)

I know at least in the US doctors able and willing to give a terminally ill patient any "street drug" under the sun. Even meth. So when you consider all of the other drugs someone like a cancer patient is already on and add a powerfull psychedelic into the mix..sure you can tell yourself "Oh look, I lowered the amount of anxiety he had about death" But probably all you have done is just fucked up this poor guys brain so bad that he doesn't really understand where he is or what is going on.
“..the simplest thing cannot be made clear to the most intelligent man if he is firmly persuaded that he knows already, without a shadow of doubt, what is laid before him.” Tolstoy
Mon Aug 21, 2017 10:18 pm
RumraketUser avatarPosts: 1170Joined: Fri Jun 25, 2010 7:49 am Gender: Male

Post Re: Psilocybin trials on attitude to death

There's some chance you can end up in a level of agony where not knowing where you are or what is going on is preferable. It will always be a very difficult call to make, and I would never say to a person who is suffering that they MUST take drugs, but I also wouldn't want to take that option away from them if they really want it.
"Nullius in verba" - Take nobody's word for it. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nullius_in_verba
Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence.
Mon Aug 21, 2017 10:35 pm
SparhafocPosts: 1333Joined: Fri Jun 23, 2017 6:48 am

Post Re: Psilocybin trials on attitude to death

Aye, for clarity I wasn't suggesting anything, or in support of dishing out psychedelics to the dying.... rather, it's just one of those interesting phenomena where deep aspects of our personality prove to be contingent on much more malleable components than we might have thought.
Beliefs are, by definition, things we don't know to be true.
Tue Aug 22, 2017 9:14 am
thenexttodiePosts: 799Joined: Fri Mar 13, 2015 7:59 pm Gender: Male

Post Re: Psilocybin trials on attitude to death

Rumraket wrote:There's some chance you can end up in a level of agony where not knowing where you are or what is going on is preferable. It will always be a very difficult call to make, and I would never say to a person who is suffering that they MUST take drugs, but I also wouldn't want to take that option away from them if they really want it.


I sat and watched my father die from liver cancer in our home. I was 25 years old. His whole body started shaking and blood was coming out his eyes and about a minute later he died. I was virtually a spilt second away from grabbing his own gun out of the closet and shooting him in the head. I have no idea what would have happened afterwards if I actually did shoot him. I think I probably would have been sent to prison.

It looked to me like he was in a lot of pain when he died. I am not sure what the right or wrong to do is in situations like this.
“..the simplest thing cannot be made clear to the most intelligent man if he is firmly persuaded that he knows already, without a shadow of doubt, what is laid before him.” Tolstoy
Tue Aug 22, 2017 8:01 pm
thenexttodiePosts: 799Joined: Fri Mar 13, 2015 7:59 pm Gender: Male

Post Re: Psilocybin trials on attitude to death

Sparhafoc wrote:Aye, for clarity I wasn't suggesting anything, or in support of dishing out psychedelics to the dying..


Of course not.
“..the simplest thing cannot be made clear to the most intelligent man if he is firmly persuaded that he knows already, without a shadow of doubt, what is laid before him.” Tolstoy
Tue Aug 22, 2017 8:14 pm
RumraketUser avatarPosts: 1170Joined: Fri Jun 25, 2010 7:49 am Gender: Male

Post Re: Psilocybin trials on attitude to death

thenexttodie wrote:
Rumraket wrote:There's some chance you can end up in a level of agony where not knowing where you are or what is going on is preferable. It will always be a very difficult call to make, and I would never say to a person who is suffering that they MUST take drugs, but I also wouldn't want to take that option away from them if they really want it.


I sat and watched my father die from liver cancer in our home. I was 25 years old. His whole body started shaking and blood was coming out his eyes and about a minute later he died. I was virtually a spilt second away from grabbing his own gun out of the closet and shooting him in the head. I have no idea what would have happened afterwards if I actually did shoot him. I think I probably would have been sent to prison.

It looked to me like he was in a lot of pain when he died. I am not sure what the right or wrong to do is in situations like this.

I don't know either and I'm sorry to hear you went through such an experience. No person should. I can't even imagine it.
"Nullius in verba" - Take nobody's word for it. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nullius_in_verba
Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence.
Tue Aug 22, 2017 8:30 pm
SparhafocPosts: 1333Joined: Fri Jun 23, 2017 6:48 am

Post Re: Psilocybin trials on attitude to death

thenexttodie wrote:
Rumraket wrote:There's some chance you can end up in a level of agony where not knowing where you are or what is going on is preferable. It will always be a very difficult call to make, and I would never say to a person who is suffering that they MUST take drugs, but I also wouldn't want to take that option away from them if they really want it.


I sat and watched my father die from liver cancer in our home. I was 25 years old. His whole body started shaking and blood was coming out his eyes and about a minute later he died. I was virtually a spilt second away from grabbing his own gun out of the closet and shooting him in the head. I have no idea what would have happened afterwards if I actually did shoot him. I think I probably would have been sent to prison.

It looked to me like he was in a lot of pain when he died. I am not sure what the right or wrong to do is in situations like this.



Sorry to hear that TNTD - sounds really hard to deal with.
Beliefs are, by definition, things we don't know to be true.
Tue Aug 22, 2017 8:38 pm
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